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"How to do Teflon/ non-stick recoating"

Disambiguation --

• If you seek a service to re-apply non-stick coatings to your cookware, please see Thread 29692

• If you're looking for repair spray; it seems no longer available, but please read & comment on Thread 10027 or Thread 12601

• This thread is for info on how non-stick coatings are made & applied.


2001

Q. I have a small breadmaker mixing blade which needs re-coating with PTFE/Teflon/Fluoropolymer (operating temperature up to 275 °C). The manufacturer's price for a new blade is almost the gross national product of a third world nation. If I can re-coat this part myself, I can save buying a new blade now and more in the future. How can I re-coat and stove this blade myself? What product would you suggest I use and is there a distributor in the UK?

John Kirkwood
- Horsham, UK
^


2001

A. John,

First off, please have a look-see at your yellow pages and find out who does PTFE coating ... there must be oodles of Companies who do this in the UK ... try also the Plastics Institute (or an equivalent) who can tell you whom to go to. Try also some of the listed 'suppliers' in plastics who might tell you (politely, one hopes) where to go to.

Horsham is a small town (used to be the UK's biggest village of 16,000 or so back in the 40's) so you may have to go to the library for London's Yellow Pages.

If your dough wasn't so 'tough' to mix and if the temperature were lower, I'd think of using straight unreinforced teflon but that's only good for 400 degr. F., I believe, and PTFE is not known for its strength and stiffness. There is a glass reinforced teflon which is stronger but think that the food inspector will not take too kindly to your using that material!

The UK does have its own 'teflon', PMCTFE but I'm not familiar with its properties.

I doubt that you could recoat the blade yourself and suggest you go to a specialist Company ... and if these blades only last a short time, why not get another one made up in metal and get that coated, too?

Cheers ... and happy mixing !

freeman newton portrait
Freeman Newton [dec]
(It is our sad duty to advise that Freeman passed away
April 21, 2012. R.I.P. old friend).

^



2001

Q. I am interested in gaining expertise in coating of all sorts on aluminum cooking utensils. Is there anybody who could guide me or provide any sort of assistance or information as to who should I contact.

Most of the kitchen utensils are made of stainless steel, or iron or sometimes even aluminum. I want to know if there is a supplier who can supply me a Teflon coating machine, which can do a Teflon coating on utensils of various sizes (usually pan size). Can a single machine be used to coat different metals like mentioned above. Maybe in a batch or a first in first out basis, or one at a time basis.

Ankit Shyam
- Lucknow, UP, India
^



2001

Q. I am doing an experiment to spin plastic waste into suitable non-woven scouring pad. My initial idea borrows from the method whereby granular sugar is spun into cotton candy. If the granular sugar is replaced by granular plastic beads then you will get the plastic cotton candy instead of the sugar cotton candy. If the condition is correct i.e., heating temperature, rpm, size of holes of the spin head, then the fine plastic threads that collect at the surrounding wall will build up to form a sheet of non woven plastic pad. The sheet of plastic pad is then slowly taken off the wall by moving it up along the wall. At the right height the sheet is slit and carried unto a revolving wheel before coiled into bundles and later cut into squares of the appropriate size. The problems envisaged are:
1. The spin head that spun the plastic granules into plastic threads is heated by an OPEN electric coil to melt the plastic. This requires complete electrical insulation.
2. The plastic threads will stick to the walls, preventing it to be moved up easily.

My question is: Is there anything in the market like "spray-on" teflon coating for electrical insulation (the spin head) and for "non-stick" teflon coating for the wall?

In the long run, in case my idea works I will certainly benefit using the practical teflon coating rather than using the usual ceramic coating.

Bian Hien Tan
- Jakarta, Indonesia
^


2001

A. Camie 2000 is a teflon spray coating that can be purchased from AE Yale in San Diego, CA. There should be other suppliers however.

Mark Dean
- El Cajon, California, USA
^

----
Ed. note Sept. 2020: Google doesn't seem to find anything current about AE Yale. According to an obit, Mr. Yale died in 2002 -- the business might have died with him. RIP, Mr. Yale.
It seems that Camie Campbell products may be available from a number of distributors, although we don't see Camie 2000 anymore.




2002

Q. I want to be able to recoat damaged photocopier rollers, frying pans and other simple household or non-complicated articles at a very low cost and doing it at a small scale. Can anyone help?

Atemnkeng, Denis
- Yaounde, Cameroon
^


2002

A. It is not so easy to apply the teflon coatings. The process will be:

  1. degrease the pieces to be recoated
  2. take out the old coating by grit blasting
  3. apply the primer (liquid) by spray gun
  4. dry the primer 200 °F 5 minutes
  5. apply the second and 3th coat wet on wet
  6. cure the coating at 750 °F

As you can see you'll need some special equipment to do it. Good luck

Jordi Pujol
Barcelona, SPAIN
^



2002

Q. Is there a Teflon spray coating available that can be applied to low profile die cutting plates. coating purpose is to resist adhesive build-ups and have a reasonable life.

Jim Taber
- Orangeville, Ontario, Canada
^


2002

A. Try Miller-Stevenson (also known as MS), they have a variety of chemicals, mold releases, etc in spray cans. Another possibility is to use wax. The stuff sold in automotive supply stores to ease putting tires on rims can be poured into a spray bottle and makes a decent lubricant.

Tom Gallant
- Torrance, California, USA
^



Teflon application in the home

2002

Q. I want to apply Teflon to the interior of a home rotisserie. Is there a spray-on or paint-on product that I can use without industrial equipment?

Bill Burke
- Chula Vista, California
^


2002

A. To make a Teflon coating you must "cure" the coating at 375 °C. Normally at home we don't have the oven to obtain this temperature. You can find in the market paint that contains PTFE that can help you having a easy cleaning surface, but this paint do not last as long as a Teflon coating.

Jordi Pujol
- Barcelona, Spain
^


March 11, 2009

? This response indicated that PTFE needs to be cured at 375 °C. It also indicates that home ovens cannot go that high. Self cleaning ovens will go higher to 482 °C.

Would this temperature destroy the PTFE coating and render it useless? The time at temperature can be controlled by unplugging the stove.

Your thoughts please.

Tim Isley
engineer - Indianapolis, Indiana
^


March 14, 2009

A. Hi, Tim. You can name any material and there will be people who think it's dangerous to use, but I personally think it's safe to use Teflon coated cookware. That does not mean it's safe to cure Teflon at home. Do a search for 'parrot Teflon' and read about how the fumes from overheating Teflon is known to kill parrots. I think it is exceptionally risky to try to cure Teflon with the self-cleaning cycle of a home oven ... or to do any industrial process in your cooking oven.

You probably cannot get the Teflon to adhere properly anyway. There is more to it than curing, the base aluminum requires the application of a special porous metallic coating to provide "key" so the Teflon will flow into the nooks and crannies so the Teflon will adhere.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^



Starting a Teflon Recoating business for Pots & Pans

2003

RFQ: I have been looking at starting a business in South Africa on recoating kitchen utensils with Teflon or similar. I need information on suppliers of relevant plant to do the job. Is anybody doing this in South Africa? Any information on this subject will be appreciated.

Shan M [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Randburg, South Africa
^

^- Sorry, this RFQ is outdated
     View Current RFQs




2003

Q. Hi and thank you for taking time to read this message. I just graduated from a local university and I majored in metallurgic engineering, I want to start a business of my own and thought that Teflon coating would be a good idea. I know about the basic properties and application procedures of Teflon, but I would like to know more about the different types of applications, and the necessity of primers and mid-coats. I am looking for a mentor who would introduce me to the business of Teflon coating.

Again, thanks for reading this.

Sincerely,

Juan E [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
^



2003

Q. HOW CAN I RECOAT COOKING POTS WITH PTFE (D-I-Y).

STAN F
PRIVATE - LUSAKA. ZAMBIA
^



2004

Q. I'm sick and tired of throwing away Teflon coated pans. No one in our area re-coats them. I'm seriously considering starting a business that would provide this service. I don't know what is involved or how to go about it. Can you help me in finding out what would be involved and the approximate cost of equipment for starting such an operation? Perhaps no one is doing it because it is too costly or too difficult to do as a small endeavor? I'd greatly appreciate any help I can get. Thanks.

S. Fernandes
retired - San Jose, California
^


2004

A. It simply is not cost effective to re-coat. The original mfgr. coats them in hundreds at a time, normally all the same size. To recoat, you would need to strip the old coating, polish the pan and recoat. Typical small business needs to charge at least $50. per hour. You would have at least an hour per pan. Then add shipping on top of that. You simply cannot compete, especially with all of the cheap stuff coming from China now.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida
^


2004
sidebar

A. I respectfully disagree with James Watts. There are a couple of Teflon recoaters: www.frypanman.com and www.fluorosurfacing.com

Ed. note: Update Dec. 2013 -- The domain frypanman.com has been just a link farm for many many years now, and fluorosurfacing.com has not existed for years either. But readers seeking a re-coating service, please see Thread 29692, "Teflon re-coating service for pots, pans, waffle irons"

They charge between 10 and 20 dollars a pan, depending on size and volume.

I gather that they do a bunch of pans at a time to get some of the benefit of larger production runs. Few people would pay even that to re-coat a pan that costs only $10 to begin with, but some higher end cookware lines like LTD have 10" nonstick pans that cost $70.

I have never applied a Teflon coating but having researched it a little, believe the process is something like:
-Sandblast the old finish off the pans
-Mix a batch of the coating
-Apply the coating
-Cure the pans in an oven

You would need a sandblaster (the fine 'beadblasting' type), a spray booth, and some kind of oven. The best starting point would be to talk to the Teflon people at DuPont and find out more about the process. Remember that what I describe above is based on slightly informed speculation rather than my own experience.

If you do go into the re-coating business, I've got some pans that need it. Good luck.

Bruce Poropat
- Berkeley, California
^


2004

A. I'm sure it will be a great business. I'm Teflon coating in Spain, and I believe you are in the good way.

To reduce pollution it is good to recycle. You can learn more about the process at www.fisasa.com/teflon_proceso.htm

Ed. note: Update Dec. 2013 -- The domain 'www.fisasa.com' is still good, but the '/teflon_proceso.htm' page no longer exists.

If you need any help, I'll do my best.

Jordi Pujol
- Barcelona, Spain
^



2005

Q. I am currently setting up in Australia. Any suggestions?

Michael Woof
- Henty, Australia
^



2004

Q. I have an application at our place of business that requires us heating up a die rule to about 275 °F. We are experiencing a lot of sticking to the die rule some days. We need a Teflon spray, etc. to eliminate this problem. If anyone can tell me the name of the spray Teflon, and/or where to get it at in southern Calif. I sure would appreciate it. Thanks,

Dennis Rice
- Commerce, California
^


2004

Q. I wish to be able to Teflon coat home cast projectiles. Could you please advise me of the process involved in connection with Teflon coating lead projectiles.

Richard Julian Varnava
Pistol club shooter - Sunbury, Victoria, Australia
^



A. Hi Dennis, hi Richard. For NON-FOOD surfaces, the Brownells spray and bake coating I previously linked to on this page might work for you. I'm not certain.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^



Teflon for DJs?

2004

Q. I was curious of different products of spray on teflon or T-Fal and their brand names. I am trying to create a new breed of slip mat. INPUT PLEASE!

Ricoh [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
DJ - Aurora, Ont., Can.
^


2004

A. Tell us what a "slip mat" is made of and what is it used for and we can give you some alternatives. Setting up your own Teflon spray rig and oven is not a wonderful idea.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida
^


2004

A. Do a google search under "fluoropolymer spray coatings" and you'll find many manufacturers as well as contract coating houses. Teflon is itself a brand name for a series of DuPont coatings. There are many types of Teflon and hundreds if not thousands of other fluoropolymer coatings.

Daryl Spindler
Daryl Spindler, CEF
decorative nickel-chrome plating - Greenbrier, Tennessee
^


2004

Q. The "slip mats" are made of various fabrics most are made of nylon dycron and other "y" "on" fabrics. I looked on the DuPont site for such products and found a spray for stain protection like a Teflon scotch guard. Do you think this would work. Thanks to all who did {or will} respond. Thud Rumble thanks you.

P.S. I have ABSOLUTELY no plans in using any bake on products. The mats are made of fabric.

Alex Karabin
Music - Aurora, Ont., Canada
^


2004

A. Okay, I still do not know the use of a slip mat, or size or properties you are looking for. The stain guard very probably will not work. There are Teflon mold releases sold in spray cans that might work, but their longevity might be questionable. Have you considered a UHMW tape? It comes in many widths, some varied thickness's and some with different choices of adhesive used. This is slightly harder than teflon and is very nearly as slippery. It can be bought in thicker sheets, but it might be hard to glue. Normal color of the tape is a nearly pure white. Does not yellow much with age either.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida
^


2004

thumbs up sign Let me guess: a slip mat is a disc a DJ puts on the turntable underneath the vinyl record so he can more easily make that annoying screech that comes from twisting the record backwards? :-)

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^


2004

! Very good ted you hit the nail right on the head in exception to the annoying part. Nothing is more annoying than a close minded person. {Hmmmm who could this be?}

P.S the UHMW tape is pricey but it works great thank you to all who have made my prototype slip mat such a success check it out at www.djqbert.com flying carpets and butter rugs. I can now quit my day job!

Alex Karabin [returning]
- Aurora Ontario
^


thumbs up sign Hi again Alex. Happy for you!

Differences in taste do not constitute "close-mindedness", simply differences in taste. Except that anyone who would slip-mat the slip-notes of Floyd Cramer's incomparable "Last Date" deserves a horse whipping :-)

Luck & Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^


2004

A. Check out US Plastics in Lima, OH for better prices. They have a web site and 800 number. A great company. You will get a religious pamphlet with each shipment, for free.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida
^



February 21, 2008

Q. I also want to re-coat a lot of my pans. I would like more info on the process. How can you adjust the thickness, and what temperature is needed to cure it, and how long at the curing temperature?,

Is there a good website for it, and where do you order the product and what is the product name to re-coat them?

Rick Harvey
- Cadet, Missouri
^



To minimize search efforts and to offer multiple viewpoints, we combined previously separate threads onto this page. Please forgive any resultant repetition, failures of chronological order, or what may look like readers disrespecting previous responses -- those other responses may not have been on the page at the time :-)



"Teflon recoating of "Benier" Kaiser Roll cutter blades"



July 9, 2009

Q. Name is Jim Summers, I'm a field tech. mainly taking care of bakery equipment,
I have a small bakery that I service His kaiser cutter blades need to be recoated
with teflon, is there a kit he can purchase rather inexpensively to recoat these himself?

Jim Summers
Service tech To industrial food industry - Zephyrhill, Florida, USA
^


July 20, 2009

A. The problem to "recoat" the Teflon* is that you will need one oven able to rise 400 °C (750 °F)to polimerize the coating. It will be cheaper to find a Teflon Coater to do that job.
;-)

Jordi Pujol
- Barcelona, SPAIN
^


September 7, 2009

A. I have to agree,
Teflon is not a D-I-Y application, I would contact the manufacturer and find out the price of a replacement part and call around to find the price to get the cutter re-coated with teflon.
Go with the cheaper option.

Marc Banks
Blacksmith - Boone, North Carolina
^



To minimize search efforts and to offer multiple viewpoints, we combined previously separate threads onto this page. Please forgive any resultant repetition, failures of chronological order, or what may look like readers disrespecting previous responses -- those other responses may not have been on the page at the time :-)



November 11, 2009

Q. Dear friends,

I too am interested in teflon re-coating for bakery pans.
Any final suggestions?.

Anyone know about the exact process & machinery required for this set up?

Please Advise.

Cheers !

Abdul Rahim
- New Delhi, India
^



November 30, 2016

Q. I have been looking at starting a business in South Africa on re-coating kitchen utensils like pots and pans with Teflon or similar. I need information on suppliers of the relevant equipment needed to do this job. I want to start small, but I know this will grow in no time at all. Any information on this subject will be gratefully appreciated.

Peter Coetzee
Private - Cape Town. South Africa
^



April 26, 2018

Q. I live in Cape Town South Africa.
I am in the used Bakery and Catering Equipment and WANT TO FIND OUT WHERE CAN I BUY NON-STICK HEAT RESISTANT TEFLON PAINT.
ARE THERE ANY AGENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA?

Hi Peter Coetzee of Cape Town South Africa -- did you have any luck finding out about Teflon coating?

Johan van der Merwe
Bakery - cape Town South Africa
^


April 2018

A. Hi Johan. Teflon for food service cannot be applied by painting. Although there are some teflon lubricants (oils and greases which also contain tiny teflon particles), you can't use these for food because a portion will come off in the food. The application of teflon anti-stick coatings to food service items is a far more complicated process than painting.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
Aloha -- an idea worth spreading
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^



May 14, 2012

Q. I am a maintenance person that repairs glue pot assemblies. I normally send out our glue pots when the surface becomes so worn and scratched that the Teflon coating is gone. This is both time consuming and extremely costly. I can do the repairs myself but I was wondering if there was a spray or a dip-in Teflon coating product that I can buy for this purpose? The glue pots can get up to 300°

william armstrong
- Oak Creek, Wisconsin us
^


Teflon/ Moly Oven Cure Firearm Finish
brownellsTeflonOvencureSpray

[affiliate link by editor to product info at Brownells]

July 28, 2012

A. You might want to check into this spray teflon sold by Brownells =>

Regards,
Craig

C Eric Paxton
- Fort Washington, Pennsylvania US
^

----
Ed. note: Craig's response is in answer to William's request for a glue-pot coating. Do not even think about using this spray for food service items!




May 16, 2020

Q. Hi there. I am looking for a non stick spray to coat my outside cameras (of course not the lens) to discourage insects and spiders crawling on them. I am a little lost on which spray would be best for the job. And would it also be ok for use on roller shutters.

Chantelle Tomas.
- Australia
^

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