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topic 53913

Titanium Roughening Process




A discussion started in 2009 and continuing through 2020
Adding your Q. / A. or Comment will restore it to the Current Topics page

December 17, 2009

Q. We have Titanium 6Al4V screws which we would like roughened to increase osseointegration. I have read several papers on Sandblasting with Large grit and then Acid-etched (SLA) but can not find any information about this on this website or any shops which would do this work. A google search for "SLA implant" brings up lots of hits though.

As I understand this, the parts can be blasted with 200 µm-500 µm Al2O3 particles and then etched in an HCl/H2SO4 solution. Is anyone familiar with this process? Is the acid etching phase related to "pickling" or passivation. I would like to be able provide a very specific description that can be followed.

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Baldwin Goodell
enginner - Bozeman, Montana, USA


December 22, 2009

A. There are several ways to activate the surface of titanium implants to create better adhesion yo the bones. One of the methods is called "volcano" and can be obtained by creating special porous oxide layer on the surface. There are other proprietary methods to obtain similar surfaces.

adv.
Contact us for more information.

anna_berkovich
Anna Berkovich
Russamer Lab
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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
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October 24, 2013

Q. In regards to the roughening of titanium alloy implants - in my case spinal screws - Can I ask if anyone can provide further information regarding the performance of the roughened titanium device once implanted? Does the surface treatment change the in vivo performance in comparison to the standard titanium screws? Thanks

Emily Smith
Medical Implant - Sydney, Australia


October 29, 2013

A. Emily,

You can purchase the article from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751616107000409 online.

anna_berkovich
Anna Berkovich
Russamer Lab
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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
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July 11, 2020

Q. I am looking for an alternative for etching titanium to create a rough surface to apply several coatings.
The current method used is oxalic acid, this is a huge time consuming process up to 15 hours.

We are thinking about H2O with 5% HF, but maybe there are other chemicals we can use.

Rob van den Dungen
- Eindhoven, The Netherlands


July 12, 2020

Hi Rob,

adv.
Please contact me directly. We provide consultations on titanium surface treatments and surface preparation. There are several methods on how safely, without hydrogen saturation, to make the titanium surface rough.

anna_berkovich
Anna Berkovich
Russamer Lab
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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
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July 14, 2020

A. It appears we are talking about two or three different processes - roughening the surface, increasing the wetability, and developing a porous oxide layer. The pictures presented by Anna Berkovich showing the "volcano" appear to be a thick porous oxide layer deposited by plasma electrolytic oxidation process. The other process is chemical etching which provides a rough surface with a thin unavoidable oxide layer. Both increase the surface wettability.

Rob van den Dungen talks of applying "several coatings" but does not specify the purpose or type of coatings. Emily Smith talks of spinal screws while Baldwin Goodell talks of osseointegration. The two may not be different. But 'biocompatibility' sometimes refers to undesirable bacterial growth on implants.
I hope it may not be out of place to add to the confusion!
Wettability can be achieved by first degreasing and then a 'simple' plasma (argon/air/oxygen) treatment. This is an environmentally friendly physical process. No significant etching is involved in this.
One can excite an electric arc on titanium surface in vacuum so that the arc moves all over the surface randomly removing titanium atoms and creating micro and nano sized craters on the surface. This is one of the PVD techniques to deposit hard coatings like TiN. This gives a clean etched surface. I don't know if anyone has used this physical technique for etching. It is worth trying.

H.R. Prabhakara
- Bangalore, Karnataka, India


July 16, 2020

A. Hi H.R.

The image of the surface in my previous posts does not refer to this question. The highly developed surface that is attached to my current posting is done by electrochemically etching the surface for future 'Brushete" coating for better ossiointegration. Can be also used for titanium surface preparation before plating.

53913-6

anna_berkovich
Anna Berkovich
Russamer Lab
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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
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