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Starting an anodizing shop



(-----) 2006

How many actual tanks I need to start our own Chromic anodizing, Per Mil-A-8625 [link is to free spec spec at Defense Logistics Agency, dla.mil]A, TypeII,
business?
Our product is 2024T3511 Alum. extrusion with a cross section of 3/8" X 2" up to 7 ft. long.
We would be running up to 1000 pieces. per week.
What tanks are the best to use ? 321S.S. or the Poly/Plastic type ?
Is there a company that can help me with all of our supplies ?
It's been a few years since I work at a shop the performed this anodizing,however, I believe following is a close step by step process.
1)Clean or degrease
2)Rinse
3)Etch
4)Rinse
5)Desmut
6)Rinse
7)Anodize
8)Final rinse
9)Blow dry

Rob Helfrich
Shop employee - Valencia, Ca.
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2006

OK, some problems. A revision of the mil spec is years out of date. Get a copy of the latest one. Next, chromic is type 1 , not type 2. So which do you really want.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida
^


First of two simultaneous responses -- 2006

Two things:

First, Chromic acid anodizing is type I, not type II. Make sure that you download the specification in question and read it over a few times before proceeding any further - being properly informed in the beginning is vital.

Second, California environmental restrictions are hell on chromic acid anodizers - make sure you include the cost of compliance in your decision as to whether it makes sense to start up your own shop or not. By the time you factor that in, you may well find that sending it out is a better choice.

Good luck either way!

Jim Gorsich
Accurate Anodizing Inc.
supporting advertiser
Compton, California, USA
accurate anodizing banner
^


Second of two simultaneous responses -- 2006

Don't invest in equipment unless certain of obtaining all necessary permits. Use Cal/Gold to find the requirements for a Metal Coating business in your locale (Santa Clarita?). The Air Permits (Authority to Construct/Permit to Operate) from the SCAQMD will perhaps require the most effort. http://www.calgold.ca.gov/

Cal/Gold has a document "Chromium Electroplating and Anodizing Tanks. What You Need to Know To Comply" available online -- see Pollution Prevention Resources. It only describes Emission Standards mandated by the Clean Air Act, not the new (2006), stricter OSHA regulations on hexavalent chromium in the workplace. For the latter, see http://www.dir.ca.gov/oshsb/hexavalentchromiumproposedreg.pdf

Take care. To your south, in the last 3 years the City of Los Angeles has inspected 47 chrome plating sites (maybe includes anodizers?), resulting in more than $300,000 in fines and penalties. Get compliance guarantees from your consultant(s) and emissions control equipment suppliers.

Ken Vlach [dec]
- Goleta, California

contributor of the year Finishing.com honored Ken for his countless carefully researched responses. He passed away May 14, 2015.
Rest in peace, Ken. Thank you for your hard work which the finishing world, and we at finishing.com, continue to benefit from.

^


2006

I should have said that the proposed site for the anodizing will be Nevada.
Also,the Chromic Anodizing will be MIL-A-8625F,Type I..
We are currently inquiring about all requirements with the state of NV.
Thanks,

Rob Helfrich
- Valencia, California, USA
^


2006

Fairly certain Nevada is still in the United States. The OSHA limits on hexavalent chromium (indoors) and Clean Air Act emissions limits (outdoor air) are both Federal regulations.

Wastewater treatment effluent limits, both for direct discharges to the environment and indirect (via sewer & POTW), also are Federal. Large sites have stormwater runoff restrictions, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The Clean Air Act, wastewater & NPDES limits are all in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). OSHA standards are in 29 CFR.

States and local governments may set stricter limits than the Federal. Rarely do, except where recycling water.

Ken Vlach [dec]
- Goleta, California

contributor of the year Finishing.com honored Ken for his countless carefully researched responses. He passed away May 14, 2015.
Rest in peace, Ken. Thank you for your hard work which the finishing world, and we at finishing.com, continue to benefit from.

^

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