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topic 29896

Soldering Lead Composition?



2004

Q. Can we use soldering lead 60/40 instead of 63/37 for our PCB/Electronic assemblies? will there be any difference in performance?

Vetrivel [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
PCB assy - Bangalore, Karnataka, INDIA


2004

A. If you are hand soldering, using 60/40 is generally OK. It is often used when doing repairs. The soldering irons will have to be hotter due to the higher melting temperature of 60/40. Also it will take a little bit longer on each joint and the joint MUST NOT be disturbed for a longer time after the solder iron is removed. If you are wave soldering, 60/40 doesn't work well because it doesn't solidify all at the same time; as it cools it becomes like a paste for a short time during which the joint MUST NOT be disturbed. If you are hand dip soldering, you can often get away with 60/40 but the extra time and care needed usually cost more than the saving from the cheaper solder.

Tom Gallant
- Long Beach, California, USA


June 6, 2013

Q. What is composition of soldering lead?

Jeffrey G. Lopez
- Los Bażos, Laguna, Philippines


June 10, 2013

A. Hi cousin Jeffrey. I think Tom implied that the answer is 60/40, which means 60% tin and 40% lead. If this is not the answer you were seeking please re-word your question because then I'm not quite understanding it. Good luck.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E.
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
Striving to live Aloha

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