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Platinized titanium anodes for electroplating: buying, making, testing



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Current postings:

May 23, 2022 -- this entry appended to this thread by editor in lieu of spawning a duplicative thread

Q. I work at a reel-to-reel plating facility and we are interested in implementing a system for monitoring the condition of the platinized titanium anodes that we employ on our precious metals plating cells.

My initial thought was to setup a test cell in 1M H2SO4 and run a set amperage through and record the voltage and use that as the gauge of anode health (assuming any deviation >10% indicated coating degradation). Only concern is I'm not sure what to use as the cathode, or if a special "god" Pt/Ti anode could be used as the cathode (assuming it is used only for this purpose).

David De Pena
- Rock Hill, South Carolina
^

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Ed. note: While you are awaiting responses to your question, we appended your inquiry to a thread which describes some other ways to determine the anode's condition.




Closely related Q&A's, oldest first:

1997

Q. I want to make the Pt/Ti anode by myself. Anyone can suggest the plating process for Platinum over Titanium?

Edmond Yeung
^


A. Technic, Inc. or Sel-Rex, Inc. have proper chemistries, but surface prep is the key. Grit blasting or fluorides are usually required.
Good Luck,
Dave
SUNNYvale, CA

Dave Kinghorn
Dave Kinghorn
Chemical Engineer
SUNNYvale, California

^



2001

Q. How can you test if platinized titanium anodes still have coating of platinum? What can destroy it? This is in reference to chrome related plating. What will be the effect on plated surface? If plating has patches, could it be due to this? (bad electrical contacts are ruled out)

Payal Mag
- Charlotte, North Carolina
^


2001

A. Put a torch to it. If it discolors, there's no Pt left.

James Totter
James Totter, CEF
- Tallahassee, Florida
^


Platinized Titanium Anode


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2001

A. This is easy. Take a cigarette lighter or small torch and play the flame on the anode mesh until it glows red in dim light. Once it is cooled, if there is an area of discoloration, then the platinum has been plated off. By the way, you can get Titanium or Columbium (Niobium) anodes re-platinized cheaper than buying them new.

Michael Brewington
plating shop - Salisbury, Maryland
^


 

A. Look under a microscope to see if you have the Ti showing. It should be gray in color whereas the Pt is black. Also if you have access to XRF and the anode fits in the chamber you could do a spot analysis to see if you have any Pt left. Usually the coating fails by erosion, as you plate you generate lots of gas and the gas bubbles wear away the coating. Another way the coating fails is by porosity in the coating. When this happens you get solution undercutting the adhesion between the Pt and Ti. As for the spots on your parts check the thickness by XRF our what method you use to see if you have a thickness distribution problem in those areas.

George Shahin
George Shahin
Atotech - Rock Hill, South Carolina
^


2001

A. VISUALLY YOU CAN SEE THE DIFFERENCE IN color OVER A PERIOD OF TIME. IF THE THICKNESS OF COATING IS LESS BECAUSE OF DISSOLUTION (EVEN ITS SAID TO BE INERT) THE COATING WILL DISAPPEAR AND IT WILL BE LEFT WITH ONLY TITANIUM(BLACKISH color). THIS WILL NOT LEAD TO PATCHED DEPOSITION, BUT IT IS SURE TO AFFECT THE CONDUCTIVITY OF ANODE AS TITANIUM IS A POOR CONDUCTOR.

S.J.VENKATASUBRAMANIA RAJA
- HOSUR, TAMIL NADU, INDIA
^


2001

A. Perhaps you can test the amount of voltage you need to pass the same amount of current in equivalent conditions.

Take a new conforming anode of the same size and shape, and compare voltage required to pass current at 100 amperes per square foot cathode current density.

High anode current density can reduce the life of the auxiliary anode.

Patchy plating could be the result of de-platinized anodes.

tom pullizzi monitor   tom pullizi signature
Tom Pullizzi
Falls Township, Pennsylvania
^


2004

A. Very simple, put the platinised anode in the furnace and heat it up to 500 °C. The result is: oxide is formed as black color in unplatinised area; platinised area is still bright like silver.

Vanajambika Jeyakumar
- Chennai, India
^



July 31, 2009

Q. Do you have a ball park figure on how much it would cost to produce platinized titanium electrodes at home instead of buying them commercially? For example, I found a quote for a 1.5 square inch electrode that was priced at $60 USD. This is expensive. I want to know what degree of cost savings i.e. percent wise, I could realize by making the electrode myself. I am thinking about making several electrodes so I hope that the cost savings might be substantial. I have the equipment for electrolysis already available.

Aaron Cowan
hobbyist - Toronto, Ontario, Canada
^


ASM Metal Handbook
9th Edition, Vol. 5

"Surface Cleaning, Finishing & Coating"
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August 3, 2009

A. Hi, Aaron. My understanding is that the best anodes are clad not plated. But Dave Kinghorn has given us some clues.

I won't say you can't do it, but I think plating platinum on titanium is quite complex for a hobbyist (I saw a facility where it was done and it was quite involved and used very aggressive chemicals), but if you successfully plate platinum on titanium, let us know how thick you went, how long they last, and what you think they cost you. Thanks.

See ASM Metals Handbook, Vol. 5 for possible pretreatment cycles for plating titanium. Good luck.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^




October 19, 2016

RFQ: Dear Sir,

We are an equipment builder for precious metal plating for technical applications.

I need to supply an electroplating line to deposit 7 microns Platinum on Nickel alloy at 92 °C with 0.5 amps /DMsq current.

My Customer insists on using 20 to 30 microns thickness Platinum coated anode mesh. Are such anodes available, if yes, please give me the lead.

Your early guidance will be helpful to complete the project in time.

K. Vishwanatha Aithal
- Bangalore, Karnataka and India

^- Sorry, this RFQ is outdated
     View Current RFQs

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Ed. note: As always, gentle readers, technical replies in public and commercial replies in private please ( huh? why?)



July 21, 2018

Q. We use 2 mm dia platinized titanium anodes to internally plate 5 mm dia stainless steel tubes. What effects am I likely to see if the Pt coating has been mistakenly removed from the substrate by mechanical abrasion; reduced / poor coverage?

Andy Chris
- Brighton, United Kingdom
^


July 23, 2018

A. Hi Andy
If the platinum has gone you are attempting to plate with titanium anodes. I don't know your process but the titanium will almost certainly anodise and will pass little if any current.
I think you need new anodes.

geoff smith
Geoff Smith
Hampshire, England
^

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