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topic 9467

Cryogenic nitrogen deburring?


(2001)

We're looking to automate the deburring of sheet metal parts in a punch press/ stamping environ. I've heard of a cryogenic nitrogen process where super cold nitrogen is aimed at the burr or flashing, rapidly cooled and flecked off by the gas pressure.

Question: Has anyone used this or knows how to make this type of process work economically? Who would I go to for help on this?

Tim Lucas
- Toronto, Ontario, Canada


(2004)

In theory, the process that you describe could work. Personally, I have never heard of anyone using that technique, but I have enough experience with liquid nitrogen and nitrogen gas to believe that it might work. There would be some safety issues, and I am not sure that it would be the most cost effective approach, but it might prove to be a viable method to remove burrs (deburr) in certain applications.

A more common technology is a cryogenic deburring process that relies on a system whereby parts are placed in a chamber, brought to an ultra cold (cryogenic) temperature, tumbled and blasted with a polycarbonate media. The burrs "freeze" stiff (or become brittle), and the tumbling action combined with the spraying media removes the burrs. This process is commercially available on a job shop basis and cryogenic deburring systems can be purchased for use in-house. It has been proven safe and economical. Both plastic and metal parts can be processed. Because the media is non-abrasive, high quality part finish is maintained and there is no dust or other residue remaining after the deburring operation.

Robin Rhodes
Worcester, Massachusetts



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