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topic 60864

How to Recover Tin, Copper & Lead from their chlorides

September 30, 2018

Q. I have a solution that contains chlorides of tin, lead and copper.
How can I recover all the three metals from them?

Rashid Khan
- Mumbai, India


September 2018

A. Hi Rashid. Unfortunately there is a good chance that it's completely non-feasible :-(

But give us an analysis of what you have or an anticipated analysis of what you expect to get, and the volume, and people can try to help. What is the source, as contaminants may make recovery more difficult? Thanks.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey
Striving to live "Aloha"


October 1, 2018

Q. Thanks for your reply. Actually I had bought a solder waste from a company that manufactures electronic circuit boards. I had its sample tested at the lab.That contains 55% tin, 40% lead & 5% copper. I dissolved it into HCl and tried to recover tin with aluminum foils. But Aluminum displaces all three metals again. So, I want to know a method through which we can recover all three metals one by one. Now, I have a solution that contains chlorides of all these three metals.
Thanks for your help!

Rashid Khan
- Mumbai, India


February 24, 2019

A. It's possible but there are many steps involved (cementation, electrowinning). Take a moment to research and read available PDF file on research called "Recovery of copper, tin and lead from the spent nitric etching solutions of printed circuit board"

Marvin Sevilla
- Managua, Nicaragua

----
Ed. note: The article Martin references is available free at
https://kundoc.com/pdf-recovery-of-copper-tin-and-lead-from-the-spent-nitric-etching-solutions-of-print.html


sidebar2 February 2019

opinion!  Thank Marvin. Hi readers ...

Many articles which I spent a lot of time writing have been taken from our website and reprinted without permission or attribution on other sites, often with ads surrounding them, so others are profiting from stealing my work. But I'm not asking you to bleed for me because, in turn, I am profiting from the work of others, such as the insightful answers offered freely by our regular readers.

Copyright law is a total mess these days as explained at kundoc.com/copyright because rules written for paper and cellulose acetate simply can't work in today's world of digital everything -- even if people are 100% honest, let alone when we employ our mighty powers of rationalization :-)

The article that Marvin references is behind paywalls at sciencedirect.com, researchgate.net, and possibly other sites, but it is also freely available at kundoc.com, and is even listed as creative commons work at scielo.br.

How does each of us decide whether we are cheating or playing fair? Are kundoc and scielo stealing what is not theirs, and am I abetting them? Or am I wrong to help huge megacorps like Elsevier extract fees from our readers that might well be unjustified through their sciencedirect site? Or should I tell readers to do their own googling instead of me trying to save each of our readers the 20 minutes that I spent, or should I spend days investigating each such situation in depth and get nothing else done?

Our basic guideline as of today is we don't post URLs to on-line books unless we're very confident that they are in the public domain because we're pretty sure they're not, but we do post links to individual articles unless the site they are on strikes us as shady. I'd love any input on this issue!

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey
Striving to live "Aloha"


February 25, 2019

thumbs up sign Thanks for clarifying this for us Mr. Mooney. How about posting links to expired Patents (specifically stated on the patent main page)? I have found many useful and insightful patents that have expired for electroforming, contact-plating, Energy Accumulators and many fields related to electromagnetism.

Marvin Sevilla [returning]
- Managua, Nicaragua


February 2019

A. Hi again Marvin. Patent sites like www.uspto.gov and patents.google.com are free and public, and patent information is deliberately publicly available so I have no issue with posting links to patents whether expired or in force. Thanks.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey
Striving to live "Aloha"



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