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Was hose defective or was it destroyed by electrolysis?





August 13, 2012

Q. Hello

We run a Tapware distribution company in New Zealand. We have a claim for a hot flexible hose that has disintegrated. I believe the problem is electrolysis and not a faulty hose. Can anyone email me pictures of any hoses that they have had that can be connected to an electrolysis problem.

Regards
Malcolm

Malcolm Box
- New Zealand



August 14, 2012

A. Hi Malcolm. Please don't hold your breath. I'm not trying to be difficult, but in running this site for 20 years I've never once seen a reader pro-actively do anything like what you want, even on everyday issues where a hundred times as many readers could help.

But if you send pictures of the hose for posting here, and fill us in on the complete details, including the possible galvanic corrosion situation, I think people are usually willing to try to help. Good luck.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey



August 15, 2012

A. I have never heard of a hose (rubber or plastic) being subject to "electrolysis".
Depending on what they are made of, they are subject to severe attack by numerous chemicals. Gasoline or it additives wiped out the plastic hoses on a trimmer and a lawnmower. Strong oxidizing agents will wipe out most. Raise the temperature and it happens much faster.

Now if you are talking about copper pipe, yes electrolysis is a problem. That is why they should have dielectric junctions in them. Do your search under copper pipe electrolysis and you will probably find words and even pictures.
I have seen them somewhere in the past.

James Watts
- Navarre, Florida


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