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Is it mandatory to have a hex-chrome-free chromium bath to be a supplier of the automotive industry?



(-----) 2007

I work for a plating shop in Colombia and have a customer who is demanding that the parts I plate for him (Duplex nickel-chromed parts) are plated in a hex chrome-free chromium bath since, he says, the automotive industry demands this from him.

I think he does not know that the baths from which the automotive industry demands to be hex-chrome free are chromates for zinc conversion and not chrome baths.

Does anybody know of any requirement about the chrome bath chemistry made by the automotive industry?

ANDRES BERNAL
PLATING SHOP - MEDELLÍN - COLOMBIA
^


2007

While it is theoretically possible that an auto company could ban chrome electroplating from hexavalent baths as part of some "green technology" initiative, I don't believe that any have done so.

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^


2007

Dear Ted.

The automotive industry in Colombia provides auto parts for Ford, Mazda, Toyota, Renault, GMC as I think you also do in the States.

Do you happen to know if any of these companies have a restriction in that matter? I have to try to demonstrate to my customer that they misinterpreted the communication (if they did, off course).

Thanks a lot for your help.

ANDRES BERNAL D.
- MEDELLÍN - COLOMBIA
^


2007

I have already answered that to the best of my knowledge there are no such restrictions. If anyone feels differently they are encouraged to reply.

Ted Mooney, finishing.com
Ted Mooney, P.E.
Striving to live Aloha
finishing.com - Pine Beach, New Jersey
^


January 17, 2008

The auto industry regulates the amount of hexavalent chrome allowed on the part after it leaves your facility. You can use hexavalent chromic acid to plate metallic chrome onto a part for the auto. Just make sure all hexavalent acid is properly rinsed off. Your customer should understand the difference between hexavalent chrome +6 and metallic chrome.

William Barry
- Hastings, MI, United States
^


January 30, 2008

This is just another example of people who do not have the correct knowledge of the specification telling the plater what to do. I have heard similar comments frequently i.e. I can't have anything with chrome on the part because its dangerous, I need to use trivalent chromates because they don't contain chrome, chrome is bad - it causes cancer, etc.

Once and for all Chrome Metal has no valence, it is a metallic surface. The surface is chromium regardless of what the bath constituents were.

According to the specifications from the European Union, the major auto manufacturers and the electrical industry, when it comes to chromium, the only material regulated is HEXAVALENT chromium. Some of the confusion may be due to the marketing of chromium replacements as an alternative to trivalent chromium in U.S. manufacturing locations for reasons of environmental and OSHA regulation.


OK, I've had my soapbox. Thank you.

Gene Packman
process supplier - Great Neck, New York
^

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