Home /
T.O.C.
FAQs
 
Good
Books
Ref.
Libr.
Advertise
Here
Help
Wanted
Current
Q&A's
Search 🔍
the Site

pub
Free personalized metal finishing help!


316HQ stainless steel



(-----)

An ongoing discussion beginning back in 2006 ...

2006

Q. Dear Sir/Madam

I am struggling with letters specifications stainless steel type 316HQ. What does "HQ" MEAN? And how many percent by weight of copper is contained? Which standard should I refer to?

HENRY SU
STUDENT - TAINAN COUNTY, TAIWAN
^


2006

A. I believe there is no grade 316HQ. Perhaps it is a misreading of 316HC?

None of the variations on the 316 theme contains copper (except perhaps occasionally as an accidental residual and unlikely to exceed about 0.2%).

Bill Reynolds
Bill Reynolds [dec.]
consultant metallurgist - Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
We sadly relate the news that Bill passed away on Jan. 29, 2010.

^


2006

A. Good afternoon:

I've never heard of 316HQ, but I have heard of 302HQ, which has a small amount of copper added for improved cold formability. Are you sure that's not the grade you are looking for?

Steve Bizub
- St Louis, Missouri
^


2006

A. After reading Steve's post, I googled 316HQ. 19 hits. The only one in English is the original posting on this thread.

The grade obviously does exist, and one summary suggests that it has copper and selenium as its main claim to fame.

A Chinese site refers to Custom Flo 316HQ and quotes the chemistry as
0.03 C max (which is strange in itself, as in that context "H" usually denotes closer to 0.08 C),
1.0 Si max,
2.0 Mn max,
17.0-19.0 Cr,
8.00-10.0 Ni,
3.00-4.00 Cu and makes no mention of Se.

Live and learn!

Bill Reynolds
Bill Reynolds [dec.]
consultant metallurgist - Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
We sadly relate the news that Bill passed away on Jan. 29, 2010.

^


2006

A. Interesting information...I wonder if it's not a discontinued grade from Carpenter Technology.
Forgot to mention earlier that HQ refers to heading quality. This is a special grade of stainless rod or wire for cold heading applications.

Steve Bizub
- St Louis, Missouri
^


2006

A. Ha! The bits of information start to mesh! letter suffixes to AISI grades usually only refer to variations or tighter ranges on the chemistry spec.

Examples are 316H (carbon high); 316L (carbon low); 316N (significant nitrogen content); 316LN (carbon low plus a significant nitrogen content). And so on for the many dozens of AISI grades of plain carbon and low alloy steels as well as high alloys such as stainless.

When HQ is used in the sense that Steve explains, referring to mechanical properties although the AISI numbers only specify chemistry, it starts a potentially messy trend, fraught with risk of misinterpretation.

However, the original poster of this question at least now has his explanation!

Bill Reynolds
Bill Reynolds [dec.]
consultant metallurgist - Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
We sadly relate the news that Bill passed away on Jan. 29, 2010.

^


May 1, 2019

A. Hi Guys
The grade exists and is used frequently on threaded products.
BUT the supplier does not address it, they just name it 316
So the Chinese reference may be the only good reference ... Thanks
Steve Hulsey

Steve Hulsey
Metallurgical - BAYTOWN TEXAS USA
^

none
finishing.com is made possible by ...
adv. 
spacer gets replaced with bannerImages

Q, A, or Comment on THIS thread -or- Start a NEW Thread

Disclaimer: It's not possible to fully diagnose a finishing problem or the hazards of an operation via these pages. All information presented is for general reference and does not represent a professional opinion nor the policy of an author's employer. The internet is largely anonymous & unvetted; some names may be fictitious and some recommendations might be harmful.

If you are seeking a product or service related to metal finishing, please check these Directories:

 
Jobshops
Capital
Equipment
Chemicals &
Consumables
Consult'g, Train'g
& Software


About/Contact    -    Privacy Policy    -    ©1995-2022 finishing.com, Pine Beach, New Jersey, USA