finishing.com -- The Home Page of the Finishing Industry
Serious Education & the most FUN
you can have in metal finishing smiley

No popups, spam, registration or passwords
HomeFAQsSuggested
Books
Help
Wanteds
Advertise
on this site
FORUM
current topics
topic 30418

Developing new paints that incorporate biocides


2004

Q. Hello,

I am a graduate research assistant at the University of Cincinnati, I develop novel organic coating systems using silanes. I am studying paint systems that have biocides or microbicides such as silver incorporated in them to address the issue of microbial corrosion. I read in an article that Cu used in some marine coatings is being phased out as it is detrimental to marine life. I want to know what is a typical biocide used in marine coatings and also in steel pipes, silver is out of the question as it is toxic. Are there any environmentally-friendly organic mild biocides being used by the coatings industry?

Thanks,

Karthik Suryanarayanan
organic coatings - Cincinnati, Ohio


2004

A. Hi, Karthik. It is possible that copper-based "bottom paint" may be outlawed, I guess, but it isn't exactly being 'phased out'. As far as I can see, every single brand and style of bottom paint listed in the Boat U.S. catalog is copper-based and depends upon copper.

It is more than a conundrum to look for an 'environmentally friendly' paint that will kill every form of marine life from algae to zebra mussels--it's an oxymoron. But it sounds like organic biocides, which might stop their killing after a few years, would be better than basic metals like copper which can presumably remain toxic to marine life even decades after they've sloughed off the bottom of the boat and onto the bay floor. On the other hand, though, organotin paints (tributyltin) have been an environmental disaster. Whatever you put in the paint as a biocide should, I would think, completely lose its toxicity after some period, perhaps depending upon the proximity of two different molecules that can be depended upon to break or not remain in proximity after the paint wears off.

You have certainly picked an interesting and important field to do your development work in. Good luck!

Ted Mooney, finishing.com Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E.
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey



If you have a question in mind which seems off topic, please Search the Site

ADD a Comment to THIS thread START a NEW threadView CURRENT TOPICS

Disclaimer: It's not possible to diagnose a finishing problem or the hazards of an operation via these pages. All information presented is for general reference and does not represent a professional opinion nor the policy of an author's employer. The internet is largely anonymous & unvetted; some names may be fictitious and some recommendations may be deliberately harmful.

  If you need a product/service, please check these Directories:

JobshopsCapital Equip. & Install'nChemicals & Consumables Consult'g, Train'g, SoftwareEnvironmental ComplianceTesting Svcs. & Devices


©1995-2018 finishing.com, Inc., Pine Beach, NJ   -   About finishing.com   -  Privacy Policy
How Google uses data when you visit this site.