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topic 1492

Selective Blackening Process for Stainless Steel


(1998)

Is there a process whereby we can blacken selective areas of stainless steel (similar to what they do on Stainless Steel rulers) and if so what are the steps involved.

We currently apply an automotive Acyrlic and after it has fully cured scrape off the excess paint. This is very slow and time consuming and always ends up with paint chipping especially around the edges of the wording.

We use a dry film resist (film used in the Photochemical Machining) so the blackening process has to withstand an alkaline bath (pH 11-12) and temperatures above 50°C.

Brad Parker
Mastercut Australia


(1998)

This may be a long shot, but you might be able to copper plate the surface (probably very thin) and then chemically blacken the copper.

Danny Miller



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