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topic 0757 p2

Restoring a National Cash Register, p. 2



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A discussion started in 1998 but continuing through 2019


2000

Q. I am trying to get the tarnish and dirt off of a brass bed. I have gone through lots of "Brasso" and lots of rubbing. Can someone tell me of a commercial product that would make this job easier? HELP!

Jill C [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Spring Creek, Nevada


2000

Q. I model in HO scale Railroading. One of the most prize possessions for modelers are brass locomotives and cabooses. These scale models don't lend themselves to easy polishing (due to many,many small and delicate parts.) There are also crevices and nooks and crannies. When these models begin to tarnish it is very difficult to stop it. Can anyone suggest some type of dip or bath to provide a general cleaning and tarnish removal to keep them looking new. Also does the same technique apply to cleaning, especially before painting

Don W [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Lake Champlain, New York


Tarn-X

2000

Q. I have been unable to locate Tarn-X for brass. I live in San Pedro, CA. Can you advise where it can be purchased?

Ms. Shane
- San Pedro, California


2001

A. To clean brass try soaking it in a solution of cream of tarter and water, about two tablespoons to a gallon, this works on cartridge cases well I'm sure you can apply it to other brass objects

John Z [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Walden New York


2001

A. A good method for cleaning brass is to use 1/2 teaspoon of phosphoric acid per gallon of hot water swirl a few times and presto! it's clean. Neutralize the solution with baking soda [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] until it stops fizzing and discard or save it and use it several more times.

Dennis L [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Indianapolis, Indiana


Twinkle (12 boxes)

2001

A. HELLO:

SOME YEARS AGO, I PURCHASED AN OLD COPPER FIRE EXTINGUISHER, THE COPPER WAS BLACK ALMOST, THERE WERE BRASS PLATES HALF THE SIZE OF THE EXTINGUISHER, TWINKLE COPPER CLEANER AND NOXON DID NOT TOUCH THE OXIDATION. I FOUND THAT A PASTE MADE OF SALT AND WHITE VINEGAR (WEAR GLOVES) RUBBED BY FINGERS OR SOFT CLOTH ON THE SURFACES BEGAN TO DISSOLVE THE OXIDATION. AFTER I REMOVED MOST OF THE OXIDATION, I THEN USED Noxon 7 [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] METAL POLISH TO CLEAN THE REST OF THE EXTINGUISHER AND GIVE IT A PROTECTIVE WAX COAT. LOOKED LIKE NEW.

HOPE THIS HELPS.

BARBARA L [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- BAREFOOT BAY, FLORIDA


2001

Q. RE the letter by Barbara L. How much SALT AND WHITE VINEGAR are mixed together?

Peggy B [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Hornell, New York

Ed. note: The chemistry is such that it really doesn't matter much, Peggy. One tablespoon per cupful is probably good.


2001

A. To Jack Q in Alaska. I clean houses for a living and the best cleaner I have found for stainless steel is Cameo [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] powdered cleanser. It is similar to Comet or Bon-Ami [linked by editor to product info at Amazon], but it removes the dark film buildup and surface scratches easier without as much residue to rinse off. It still requires some elbow grease but I think you will be pleased with the results.

Beverly F [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Lexington, North Carolina


2001

thumbs up signS.Szigli was right! Ketchup and steel wool dissolves even the heaviest tarnish off unlacquered brass better than any of the toxins I've tried, including Tarn-x for Brass (very poor), Brasso (only slightly better), even blueprint strength ammonia (Fantastic but a killer to use) Mix 1 gal of water with 2 oz of liquid dishwashing liquid and 8 oz. of blueprint ammonia (80% strength - household a is 20%). Immerse brass in a PLASTIC tray for 30-45 min. Results are 0% tarnish. Ketchup is friendlier and MUCH cheaper!

The best followup polish for final luster that I have found is Mother's Mag & Aluminum Polish [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] (No, I don't work for Mother's).

Thanks, S. Szigli!

Gary H [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Nokesville, Virginia


Dremel Kit

2001

A. I found a few beautiful antiques at a garage sale. My fiance and I tried for hours to get all the oxidation off with very little results. He finally came up with a great idea, the Dremel. It even has a picture on the front of the box of someone polishing brass. Just put a drop of cleaner on and push the button.

GOOD LUCK!

Dina F [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Smithtown, New York


2001

A. Hello, I work with restoring and reproducing antique brass as my full time occupation. I would like to suggest that any old brass item can be easily and relatively safely "cleaned" and prepped for proper polishing by using nearly any tub and tile cleaner product that has phosphoric acid listed as one of its ingredients. This will be much safer to use than a hydrochloric acid based cleaner. Although I use a large dip tank with a commercially available Phosphoric acid mix, I will occasionally use "The Works" tub and tile cleaner in my shop sink. This is available at nearly any Wal-Mart type store in my area. First disassemble the item to be cleaned down to the most basic parts so you can safely rinse with water after, then simply spray the cleaner on the area you are working on, scrub it in with a brush of some type, and rinse well. Do it a few times if necessary. It is important to do this in a ventilated area, and of course use gloves and safety glasses. You will find that using this as a first step will greatly reduce your polishing time.

Of course if there is some type of a finish on the part, this must be removed first, as well as any oily buildup. There are many good finish removers available (other than my strip tank, I use Aircraft Stripper by Klean-Strip, this stuff is the best water rinsing convenient use stripper I have found). Oils can be washed off first with a good dish soap and a brush.

This process will not leave you with a highly polished piece, but will greatly improve the appearance of the part and save you a huge percentage of the work necessary to polish. Some people are satisfied though with the end results and will leave it.

As far as a good polish? I use only a mechanical buffing lathe combined with experience, different types of compounds, wheel types, speed and techniques. I would not recommend this process for the inexperienced, you can easily destroy detail or the piece. It is the only way to get the proper shine out of an old piece of brass, it has to be done properly though.

As far as a suitable finish to protect the brass from further tarnish. Look no further than your local band instrument retailer who has a good repair shop. There have been bake on epoxy finishes designed specifically for brass and available to the musical instrument manufacture and repair trade since the fifties, do not let any one talk you into an air dry finish though, it will not last. Also do not use any automotive type clear coat, it will not work well and is difficult to strip later. As with any finish, the brass must be properly degreased before application, or the finish will not look good, if it sticks at all.

Best of luck!

Regards,

Christopher H [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
antique auto brass - Saint Johns, Michigan


2002

thumbs up signI just found this web site and am grateful to who ever posted the problem of cleaning Brass, I tried every thing that was listed and must say for cost, and time, the Vinegar is the best so far. I tried both white and red wine, Red wine worked the best.

Thank you,

Betty W [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Woodbridge, Virginia


2002

A. By far the easiest and cheapest solution (and the most environmental friendly) is lemon juice and salt. Make sure you dissolve enough salt in lemon juice. Wipe with a soft cloth dipped in the solution. Rinse and dry the brass thoroughly. Apply a thin coat of olive oil if the item will not be handled or is for food. Or apply a polyurethane coating (such as Turtlewax Car Wax [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] wax for your car) for a long lasting finish and for items exposed to the sun and heat. No elbow grease required.

Kerry M [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- La Luz, New Mexico


2002

A. Those of you looking for Tarn-X, it is made by Jelmar. Their website allows you to find a location near you. Now I have found out where to get it I will be able to get my husband to clean the silver again. :-)

Ross B [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Riverside, California

2002

A. I am polishing a solid brass bell, and it's tiny-creviced hanger, on a sailboat and found something much better and thicker than Brasso. I initially bought it because it is in a sturdy plastic bottle. The brand is Burnishine Copper, Brass and Metal Polish. The polish company is in Gurnee, IL. The rest is just elbow grease, then a polishing wheel and CLR [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] polishing stick.

Nancy B [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]


2003

A. Do not use ammonia or Tarn-X on brass, it is not good for it.

Simon D [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]


2003

A. What I have found that is great at removing tarnish from brass is CLR [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] This product is used for cleaning bathroom scum from tubs and sinks. CLR contains Phosphoric acid which I read earlier in the responses is great at removing tarnish from brass. I have an old brass ceiling lamp that was heavily tarnished and this stuff worked good at removing it. I had to soak it for many hours for heavy tarnished brass before it would remove the tarnish, but what a difference afterwards. I think I'll use Brasso to polish it up.

Larry T [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Cortland, New York


2003

A. For any metals, jewelry, brass, silver, chrome ANY, use Hagerty 100 [linked by editor to product info at Amazon]. It does miracles to the worst of tarnished items. It cleans and polishes with no rinsing. It is great...

Kim M [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
- Phoenix, Arizona


2004

A. I have read through 95% of these; we have two 100 year old brass light fixtures. I was at wits end about how to clean them. I tried the Dremel [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] w/Brasso...ketchup....vinegar. Before going out to buy another product, I tried this: Lysol toilet cleaner. Jackpot...in the BIGGEST way. It took me an hour to clean the whole thing by hand ... minimal elbow grease, little nooks and crevices, the whole works. Finish looks very cool; like antique brass. We are VERY pleased! We are restoring a Victorian house, and desperately want to keep the fixtures, and now we will be able to.

Sylvia Kroger
- Centerville, South Dakota


2004

A. I like Flitz [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] which is made in Germany but usually available in hardware stores.

Joyce Bentfield
- Warwick, Rhode Island


2004

A. The best way to restore brass, bronze or copper items is to have them refinished professionally. You can look in your yellow pages under metal finishers or plating.

Jeff Santeler
- Orlando, Florida

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Ed. note: ... or, since you're already here, just click here for a list of refinishing shops whose support makes these pages possible.


2004

A. Brass! what a pain to clean; the ketchup trick works for some unknown reason and try it as it is fab. There are many other mixtures you can make from household substances but ketchup is the best for brass. Others I have tried which worked, but not as well, are: mixtures of salt vinegar and flour. or lemon and baking soda [linked by editor to product info at Amazon] or vinegar and salt. or lemon juice and cream of tartar. or Worcester sauce. or toothpaste. (but please note only use clear vinegar as the brown stuff cause a weird pink reaction to the brass!) But as for other metals and also for removing the lacquer from brass there is one simple answer and it is unbelievable to watch! Take and plastic bowl place household kitchen foil in it covering the inner sides of the bowl and fill with warm water(not hot) and add soda crystals (these are found by the washing powders in the supermarkets) to the water allowing them to dissolve then take your gold/ silver/ brass object and submerge it in the water. It takes seconds and all the grime tarnish and dirt just comes straight off the foil attracts it all. You are left with beautifully clean objects.

Please note : if using this to get rid of lacquer leave in the substance slightly longer but beware it does not work on gold or silver plated objects hope these tips help!

Sarah Broadhurst
- England, UK


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