netneut
finishing.com -- The Home Page of the Finishing Industry
A website for Serious Education, promoting Aloha,
& the most FUN smiley you can have in metal finishing


Finishing.com has been free for 22 years,
but without net neutrality we could soon
cease to exist. Do us a solid, click on
the banner, and contact congress today!
HomeFAQsBooksHelpWantedAdvertiseForum
topic 328

Info on porcelain panels for building exteriors, used in the 1970's & 1980's


(1996)

Q. I am trying to find out any information (in layman terms) on the factory process used in the 1970's and 1980's to apply porcelain finishes to metal panels designed to be used on the exterior of commercial office buildings. It would be helpful to know what type of primers if any were used on the various substrates. I am compiling a report on various coating systems used on panels for exterior exposure.

Andrew Fitzpatrick
- Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Advances in Porcelain Enamel Technology

(1996)

A. Enameled steel is typically coated in a two-coat process, using a "ground coat" designed for adhesion to steel, and a top coat designed for color and lack of porosity. Since the enamel has to be fired, primer is not used. The steel may be prepared using a heated power washer, possibly with a phosphate conversion coating.

The enamel can be applied using conventional wet spraying, powder coating, or by an electrodeposition process. It is typical, but not the rule, that the ground coat is fired before application of the topcoat.

Enamel is actually composed of "frit", which is glass and pigments, often mixed with water and binders. The resulting coating is fired glass, which is highly impervious to weather, but brittle enough to flake off if the substrate is bent.

Andy Brush
finishing equipment - Strongsville, Ohio


thumbs up signVery concise and informative answer, Andy. Thanks. I see a lot of people calling paints "porcelain" or "ceramic" based on them having particles of ceramic in them, but my understanding, like yours, is that for it to actually be porcelain, the frit has to be fired and fuse together similar to glass.

Regards,

Ted Mooney, finishing.com Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey



This public forum has 60,000 threads. If you have a question in mind which seems off topic to this thread, you might prefer to Search the Site

ADD a Q or A to THIS thread START a NEW THREADView This Week's HOT TOPICS

Disclaimer: It's not possible to diagnose a finishing problem or the hazards of an operation via these pages. All information presented is for general reference and does not represent a professional opinion nor the policy of an author's employer. The internet is largely anonymous & unvetted; some names may be fictitious and some recommendations may be deliberately harmful.

  If you need a product/service, please check these Directories:

JobshopsCapital Equip. & Install'nChemicals & Consumables Consult'g, Train'g, SoftwareEnvironmental ComplianceTesting Svcs. & Devices


©1995-2017 finishing.com     -    Privacy Policy
How Google uses data when you visit this site.