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Want list of RoHS compliant metals and finishes

(2004)

Q. Is there a website somewhere I can look for a list of metals and metal finishes that would tell me whether or not they are RoHS (Reduction of Hazardous Substances) compliant (do not contain lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, PBB or PBDE?)

Ari Ito
manufacturer - San Carlos, California, USA

wikipedia
PBB
PBDE


(2004)

A. The following sites provide some guidance.

https://bomdetail.services.ibm.com/matcodes/matcodes.nsf/pages/mat41.htm
https://bomdetail.services.ibm.com/matcodes/matcodes.nsf/pages/mat06.htm

Michael Young
Quantum - Colorado Springs, Colorado

----
Ed. note: As often happens, these links are not working some years later :-(
May we ask that when leaving future links, readers please try to briefly summarize them, or include Titles of the articles? We are trying to build a permanent reference archive, but most sites aren't, so the links are often a problem :-)


March 6, 2014

A. Ted: In case anybody's interested, the links from the old 2004 post can still be viewed via the wayback machine at archive.org
Although I suspect with the constantly changing finishing world, all such "master lists" fall out of date rapidly anyway. As you said in your recent post, it's not terribly difficult to determine if a given coating process meets RoHS or not.

Ray Kremer
Stellar Solutions, Inc.

McHenry, Illinois



March 2014

thumbsup2Thanks Ray. Great point about the Wayback Machine! I enjoy the nostalgia of looking at the early days of my own site there, but often forget to look for outdated documents there.

Heeding my own advice, those documents are entitled "Platings, Anodizings, Coatings" and "Carbon Steels" and they summarize the RoHS compatibility of IBM codes and specifications.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


February 28, 2014appended

Q. I would like to know RoHS compliant finishes on fasteners and also the materials that can be used for making fasteners.

Is there a website somewhere I can look for a list of metals and metal finishes that would tell me whether or not they are RoHS (Reduction of Hazardous Substances) compliant (do not contain lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, PBB or PBDE?)

Sridharan Kathiravan
- Chennai,Tamil Nadu,India
  ^- Privately contact this inquirer -^


February 2014

A. Hi Sridharan. Up to a point, RoHS requirements are easily applied in process-of-elimination fashion:

- Lead is a problem, so most tin-lead solder plating is problematic, and leaded brass material and other "free cutting" materials that include lead can be a problem.
- Mercury is a problem but isn't often found to my knowledge in fasteners or coatings for fasteners.
- Cadmium is a problem, so cadmium plated fasteners are out.
- Hexavalent chrome is a problem, so chrome-bearing conversion coatings on aluminum and on zinc alloys must be trivalent chrome.

Where it gets trickier is with coatings that may have trace ingredients that exceed RoHS standards. A few years ago electroless nickel platings could be a problem because they contained small amounts of lead and or cadmium. So today one has to be careful to specify that the electroless nickel coatings must be RoHS-compliant. Some galvanized coatings might have excessive lead beyond what is permissible.

After you limit yourself to materials that are not "obviously" out of compliance, careful checking plus specific assurances from the provider are required. Good luck.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


April 2, 2014

Q. Is PASSIVATE PER MIL-S-5002 C, TYPE 1 finish RoHS compliant? If it is not then what would make it RoHS compliant?
Please reply for this question.

Trevor Athayde
- Goa,India
  ^- Privately contact this inquirer -^


April 2014

A. Hi Trevor. If I am correct, that spec was superceded in 1989 by Revision D, so you probably ought to try to update to a recent spec if possible, but at least its 1989 replacement, MIL-S-5002 [link is to spec at TechStreet].

But the thing is, the spec you are referencing, "Surface Treatments and Inorganic Coatings For Metal Surfaces of Weapons Systems", is more about general metal finishing methodology than specific finishes. In fact, it covers at least "passivation" of zinc platings with chromate conversion coatings and "passivation" of stainless steel. So it really isn't possible to answer your question of whether the passivation that you have in mind is RoHS compatible. Please explain your situation and we can probably help you. Good luck.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

May 22, 2014

A. When I look up standards with the number 5002 at ASSIST Quicksearch (http://quicksearch.dla.mil) it gives me MIL-DTL-5002 rather than MIL-S-5002. I'm not sure what the distinction is, they seem to both have the same title.

It's actually up to revision E in 2011.

If we are talking about stainless steel here, all it does is refer to QQ-P-35 (rev D and earlier) or ASTM A967/AMS 2700 (rev E). So stainless passivation per MIL-S-5002C TYPE 1 is really asking for passivation per QQ-P-35 Type I.

All stainless passivation is RoHS compliant, because it is not an additive process. The chemical bath does not add anything to the surface, much less any of the substances on the RoHS "naughty list". Stainless passivation is a process of removing surface iron to allow a chromium oxide layer to form.

Ray Kremer
Stellar Solutions, Inc.

McHenry, Illinois


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