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Will distilled water conduct electricity?

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Q. I AM CURRENTLY DOING A 5TH GRADE SCIENCE PROJECT AND I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF DISTILLED WATER WILL CONDUCT ELECTRICITY AND IF IT DOES NOT CAN YOU TELL ME WHY.

KASSIE Bdeleted
STUDENT - WEST BABYLON, NEW YORK


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A. This may be a bit advanced for 5th grade, Kassie...

Everything is relative, so yes, distilled water will conduct electricity--but very very little compared to city water, well water, or salt water. The reason is that the way a liquid conducts electricity is for the positively or negatively charged ions that are in it actually moving from one of the electrodes to the other, carrying their positive or negative charge (electricity) with them. Salt water has salt in it, NaCl, which readily ionizes or dissociates to ions of Na+ and Cl- which can float through the water carrying charge and thus conducting electricity.

Distilled water is water that was boiled to steam and re-condensed to water. Virtually all the salt that was originally in it is left behind as the pure water boils away. So distilled water is relatively pure H2O (HOH). There is only a very tiny amount of salt left in it, and although water can ionize to H+ and OH- sort of like salt does, it ionizes to a far, far, far, lesser degree and is therefore very resistant to conducting electricity; there are virtually no ions available to carry charges through the water, so it is very high resistance, very low conductivity.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

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Q. To what extent does distilled water ionize, and what causes it to do so? I was wondering about the possibility of running an electrical system like a PC under pure distilled water. Is this feasible?

Thanks,

Edward Sinclair
- Swaffham, Norfolk, England (near Scotland)


 

A. Hi, Edward. Yes you can run electrical devices submerged in very very pure water. But distilled water may not be pure enough. And as soon as you put the PC in the water, salts from soldering fluxes and other sources will start contaminating the water so it's no longer de-ionized. You probably would need to recirculate the water through a very capable deionization system such as is used to generate ultra pure water for semiconductor fabrication to remove that salt, catching all the salts that start dissolving from the PC so you can keep the water pure enough to not conduct. This is the theory, but it's probably a dangerous and impractical experiment for a student.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


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A. Water doesn't conduct electricity at all ... sorry but it is true.

Joyce Eblen
- Manhattan, Kansas


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Joyce, don't be quick to jump to conclusions based on myths you've been told all your life. The truth is water DOES conduct electricity, even PURE DISTILLED water. The fact is electrically speaking there is 3 categories of materials: Conductors, insulators, and semi-conductors. Even insulators will conduct electricity if sufficient voltage is applied to them to overcome their huge resistance.

While developing a precipitation sensor I personally conducted multiple experiments on conduction thru water and especially distilled water as rain water is mostly mineral free. I tried various brands of distilled water and even some I distilled myself thru a vat system. The results were all the same. At 12 v and using the same distance apart on the electrodes I observed a current of about 70 micro amps passing thru the water. And yes, you're right that's a horrible conductor but it was NOT zero it did conduct and using higher voltages would even further overcome the resistance and the results would most likely NOT be linear as you increase the voltage the resistance would break down and you would see a curved results line.

Jared Greathouse
- Chillicothe, Ohio


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Indeed water can be rated by its conductivity. For example, in the semiconductor industry they often use "ultrapure" water with a conductivity of 18 micro-ohm-cm.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

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Q. I am a 6th grade student doing a science experiment on whether a battery can conduct through water to make a buzzer ring. So far I have used two 1.5 V AA batteries with nothing, then I added another 1.5 V with nothing happening. Finally, I hooked up a 9 V and nothing happened. When I touched the wires together under water the buzzer rang but even if the wires were a mm apart the buzzer did not work. Do I need a stronger battery or do I really need A LOT of electricity? Or will this even work?

Barbara Gdeleted
- Fort Worth, Texas


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A. I suspect that it won't work, Barbara. Liquids do not conduct electricity anywhere near as well as metal. Do not use a higher voltage battery, as it could start getting dangerous. But start by putting the two wires very close together in a bowl of wet salt. If that doesn't work, it doesn't work. If it does, use more water and less salt until it doesn't work to track the results. Good luck.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey


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A. Interesting. I was just pondering this subject -- nice to know that others are inquiring. I have always said that water is a poor conductor, never knew any specifics though. I have ran many 12 V DC applications completely submerged in H20 with no issue.

Ben Lewis
- Newberry, Michigan


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Q. I AM IN 6th GRADE AND I AM DOING A PROJECT ON "IS WATER A CONDUCTOR OF ELECTRICITY" AND I HAVE FIGURED OUT THAT WATER IS NOT A CONDUCTOR UNLESS YOU USE WELL OR CITY BECAUSE THEY HAVE MINERALS AND DISTILLED WATER YOU HAVE TO ADD IMPURITIES SUCH AS SALT AND I WAS WONDERING IF I WAS RIGHT.

JIMMY Pdeleted
SCHOOL - MARBEL HILL, GEORGIA


November 2014

Hi Jimmy. Sound like a reasonable conclusion to me.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


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A. I am the father of a second grader who is learning how water conducts.

Our experiment was performed with one AA battery, three cups half filled with water and different amounts of salt, and an electric motor.

At first we used a wire for the contact but found that the wire only bubbled when the battery was applied.

That didn't mean we needed more electricity or salt, it meant that we needed more surface area.
So we attached some aluminum foil to the end of each wire that was in the cups and then it worked.

In most cases, electricity travels around the outside of a solid object first.

In a liquid, because a liquid is always in motion, energy will move through the inside with ease.

In our experiment, we increased the surface area of the solid so the maximum amount of metal was touching the liquid, so the maximum amount of electricity could be transferred.
Hope this helps.

Jeromydeleted
- Bellevue, Washington


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Q. I just did an experiment w/ my daughter using a series of L.E.D.'s (+ to -) I soldered together along w/ a 1k ohm resistor between the 9-volt battery and the L.E.D.'s on both positive and negative end. This experiment worked great. I used jumper wires w/ alligator clips to connect one end (+ or - doesn't seem to matter) from the battery directly (via the resistor) to the corresponding (+ to + or - to -) pole on the L.E.D.'s. On the opposite pole I used two sets of jumper wires one running from the battery to a plastic bowl of distilled water then a second jumper wire from the opposite end of the bowl (not touching the first) to the L.E.D.'s (again + to + or - to -) via the resistor. I hope this doesn't have some inherent flaw in it.

Jason Detty
- Bremerton, Washington


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Diodes only allow electricity to flow in one direction, Jason, so the polarity should matter. I'm surprised that it could work if the diodes were reversed, but I may have misunderstood your description. I note this so that if you start getting anomalous results, of when current flows and when it doesn't, the direction of the diodes can account for the current not flowing.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

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Earth Science for Every Kid


Kids Guide to Research


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Q. So... if it's impossible to have truly pure, particle-free water, then we have to ask the ultimate question of: "Does water, in it's most basic, purest form, conduct?" I always thought that the answer, in theory, was no. After a lot of cross-referencing and much deliberation, I've come to the tentative conclusion that, electrons, in their affinity for diffusion in favor of a conductor, will travel through any object, water included, up to a point, depending on the strength of the charge. Electrons, being what electrical currents are comprised of, are too powerfully simple, and unstoppable in their never-ending quest for molecular diffusion.
That being said, I think that since all things are made up of atoms, and that they themselves already have electrons present, that all those things already have a natural affinity for accepting the purchase of outside electrons traveling in a diffusive nature.

PFC Steve J Bell, Cmbt Medic
- Camp Taji, Iraq-OEF


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First things first, Private Bell: THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY!

Very pure water used in semi-conductor fabrication is 18 megaohm-cm. You can compare this to other materials and see that the resistance is very very high. Pure water conducts very very little, but it conducts. Pure water conducts very very slightly because H2O very very very slightly ionizes to H+ and O--^OH- and/or because it is impossible to remove every single contaminating ion.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey


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Water will not ionize to give you doubly charged O (i.e., O--) but rather hydronium (H3O+) and hydroxide (OH-). The protons don't just break off, they have to be taken off.

Just adding my chemist hat's two cents :)

Eric Freeburg
- Jonesboro, Arkansas


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Absolutely, Eric. I can't account for my writing something which was so obviously and knowingly wrong. Must have been on my 3rd nightcap :-)

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

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Q. 50 years ago I did a science project, trying to determine whether heat affected the conductivity of electrolytic solutions. It did. I used 3 different solutions, can't remember what they were. Trying to help young friend now in High School do same experiment. I used household AC current, blew a few fuses. He is planning to use 6-volt battery, reading conductivity via a small multi-meter. It may work (hasn't tried yet) but I don't think it would be as impressive, although safer. Do you agree, and how would be a safe way to pass AC current through containers of liquid? And should the meter be in-line, or with probes immersed in the liquid, between nails or copper rods or whatever he uses? Any suggestions on how to make it more impressive or better? I merely used hotplates to heat the solutions.

Jan Myers
- San Antonio, Texas


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You and I grew up in a different world from today, Jan. Passing house current through water for a high school science project would be recklessly dangerous with its potential for electrocution.

Maybe capturing the hydrogen evolved from the passage of current, as well as measuring the current with a multimeter may make the experiment more interesting. If you are a mad scientist, maybe it could be rigged up to burn the hydrogen as it's evolved.

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

Digital Multimeter


January 14, 2008

Q. Seeing as how deionized water has no ions. Would, say a portable device like a hand held still work if was submerged in the water?

Mike Ddeleted
student - Branford, Florida


January 30, 2008

A. Yes, very pure water does conduct a little.
I would definitely suggest that connecting household current directly into a container of water is unscientific and dangerous. If you really want to know, find yourself a decent multimeter, set it to megohms, and stick the probes in the water. Failing that, get a very cheap calculator and stick it in distilled water. If it stops working properly, you'll have your answer.

Phil Jackson
- Portsmouth, Hampshire, England


April 4, 2008

Q. Are there any superior materials you can mention that are fairly accessible that when dissolved in water will heat rapidly with electricity applied that aren't toxic? This is a science project to reinvent the jail-house immersion heater.

Thanks,

Jason Ndeleted
- Keansburg, New Jersey


April 29, 2008

Q. Hey Science nerds,

Today in my amazing science class, we did an experiment on the conductivity of water. We tested many different types of water. In our results we found out that pure distilled water did not conduct electricity but water which had chemicals added to it like sea water did.

From this set of results we realized that water only conducts when it forms an ion.

Please can someone reply, I would love to be part of the science gang.

Tom Year 10 (mental age of a 8 year old)

Tom Kdeleted
- New York


October 4, 2008

Q. My friend and I are doing a science project in school and we are in grade 8 and we were wondering why does electricity flow in water? our aim is to create electricity through running water. We also want to demonstrate that with more salt added to the water, the brighter the light bulb will get.

so my question is whether electricity does flow in water and how?

Karima Wdeleted
student - Bali, Indonesia


October 16, 2008

A. I'd like to take a scientific stab at answering this question for the readers.
Electricity flows because of the transmission of energy through ions, which can be referred to as charged particles.
Like it has been said on this forum before, water can ionize in an aqueous (liquid) form to the less common H30+ and OH- ions. This causes water to be a very weak electrolyte no matter how many times it is boiled or deionized.
Other liquids like sugar or car antifreeze, don't break down into ions in liquid form, therefore they don't conduct electricity unless they have impurities. Even molecules that ionize in water won't conduct electricity if they are in a solid form (salt in the shaker).
It has been proposed that water makes energy and that an increase in ion concentration (adding more salt) will increase the current flow or voltage. If the bulb were connected to the battery on one pole and a wire attached to the other pole leading to a container of water, another wire could be strung from the other pole of the battery and this would make the glass of water a switch or resistor. The wires could be removed/replaced in the water to connect the circuit; the resistance of the water could be lowered by increasing the amount of ions in the water (which could be increased by adding salt or other substances that ionize in an aqueous solution). Ohm's law says Voltage = Current / Resistance, so the less resistance the higher the voltage and the brighter the bulb.
Water is generally harnessed through it's kinetic energy or through energy gained from it's disassociation/re association (i.e., hydrogen fuel cell).

Erik Rogers, BSME
- Riverside, California


November 15, 2008

Q. My daughter is working on a similar science project, however, she is using soda, orange juice, and distilled water. Will electricity flow through soda and orange juice?

Laura Martinez
- Chicago, Illinois

December 10, 2008

A. Hi, Laura. Experienced researchers usually do the research first and the experiments second to save some effort. But those researchers have self confidence and expertise formed from many years of prior experience, and they can usually be trusted to honestly record their findings when they differ from what their research led them to believe would happen (unless they are starving climatologists).

But I think students should do the experiment first and the research later because a young student will almost never have the experience and self confidence to trust their own findings when they don't agree with the research. And consequently they will carefully practice and carefully learn "junk science" (learning to subtly lie to themself and adjust what they "saw" to match the answer they're 'supposed' to get).

So tell us what results she got when she tried to get electricity to flow through soda and orange juice, and then we'll try to help her understand those results. Good luck.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

January 3, 2009

Q. Why does water conduct electricity and other objects do not?

Chris Hdeleted
student - Elkridge, Maryland


January 10, 2009

Hi, Chris. Please express your question in terms of what has already been said on this page, rather than starting over. But pure water does not conduct electricity and many other objects do, so now you have two reasons to rephrase it :-)    Good luck.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


January 13, 2009

Q. I am a 6th grader doing a science project on making a light bulb light up with distilled water and other substances. I have about tried everything but my light bulb won't turn on. What are some good substances I should try?

Casie Pdeleted
Student - El Paso, Texas


January 14, 2009

Hi, Casie. No liquid will conduct electricity anywhere near as well as copper wire, so it is possible that your bulb is too big or your batteries too small. But try very salty water and, instead of just putting two wires in it, attach sheets of aluminum foil to them as Jeromy from Bellevue, Washington described. Good luck.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey


February 17, 2009

Q. If pure water does not conduct electricity, why do I still need to be careful about electricity near water?

grade 12 student

Sara Bdeleted
student - Calgary, Canada


February 17, 2009

A. Hi, Sara. Because you are unlikely to find "pure" water and, even if you did, whatever went into the water, whether it be you and or some electrical device, will immediately render the water impure. Saying that pure water doesn't conduct electricity is something for science class not for real life.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


March 2, 2009

Q. Our third grader is preparing a science fair project and he wants to focus on batteries and what conducts electricity best. He was going to focus on various random liquids from vinegar to salted water. But we wonder if it might be more interesting for him to do the project focusing on different types of salt water - homemade salt water, ocean salt water, tropical fish saltwater, Clorox that has converted to salt (does it really?)...and so on. Do you have any thoughts on this approach? Thanks so much from all of here.

Susie Kher
student's parent - Sammamish, Washington

March 4, 2009

A. Hi, Susie. Table salt is sodium chloride. Sea salt is largely sodium chloride (NaCl) but will contain traces of other salts, as will aquarium salt. Bleach (NaOCl) is not salt, although you may be right that it can be converted to salt.

I think you are on the right track of trying to search for some relationship rather than just measuring the conductivity of a dozen different things with no organizing principle, but I'd go further. I think the best approach would be to measure the conductivity with varying amounts of sodium chloride added to the water, and graphing the relationship. You can start with distilled water and go all the way from a very tiny pinch of salt in distilled water to a thick paste of salt and water. Hopefully the conductivity vs. the concentration will produce a nice graph that offers some insights. (For example, you may find that the conductivity tops out early on and additional salt has no effect).

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


September 17, 2009

A. Hi,
I am doing some research on the internet tonight and I stumbled on this website. First, I would like to say the kids on this page are smarter than the kids I knew when I was their age. Secondly, I want to let everyone know that under certain conditions, electricity can pass through any point in space without any medium! For most practical applications this is of no concern but even the conductivity of air is important when it comes to lightning. This phenomena is governed by the permittivity of free space. Materials multiply this effect by their relative permittivity.

Wilburn Whittington
- Starkville, Mississippi


February 10, 2010

Q. How much plain table salt do I need to add to a gallon of distilled water to give it a pH of 7.2?

Sela Randazzo
- Sacramento, California


February 19, 2010

Hi, Sela. pH is a measure of hydrogen ion concentration. Plain table salt is NaCl. Why would you expect that adding Na and Cl would affect the amount of hydrogen ion? Good luck.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

March 10, 2010

! I use triple distilled water (made for injections and medicinal use) to make my own colloidal silver.

I have 3 x 9v batteries in series and run a wire from pos. and neg. to pure silver wires immersed at least an inch apart in the water.

The voltage is 27 volts with a 33k ohm resistor in line, the current runs at below 1 milliamp, which is tiny.

When the system starts off the multimeter reads just over 2 volts current traveling between the silver wires. If water was not a conductor then this would not be possible.

Simon Newton
- Brighton, U.K.


 

Hi, Simon.

Voltage is not a measure of the electrical current that is flowing, it is a measure of electrical "pressure".

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

April 1, 2010

Q. In salt water, is there any data describing how far an electric current would travel? The (admittedly odd) hypothetical application would be: could you use electricity to defend yourself as a diver in salt water?

Thank you!

John Ludwick
- Indianapolis, Indiana, USA


November 14, 2010

A. Well here I am looking up things for an experiment that I just completed in school and I can't believe some of these answers.

I am in grade 9 and I only just did a prac assignment about the salinity level in water and if the level affects the conductivity (electrical current passing through).

We had a beaker of distilled water in a beaker which was attached to a conductivity probe (a device that lets the electricity pass through the water), wires and alligator hooks attaching each end to an ammeter and a variable power supply (battery) then attaching these all together. The conductivity probe had a light on it so we could tell if the current passed through.

We tested this experiment with 6 volts to be safe. The distilled water wouldn't conduct the electricity and we knew this because we took out the probe/water from the circuit and the ammeter reading shot up to 10. Next we changed the bulb to see if it had blown. Still no luck. Then we changed the distilled water to normal room temperature tap water. This didn't work whether so we had to go with that our control test didn't really work.
We added 1 then 2 then 3 tsp of salt and each one came up with a reading on the ammeter, increasing each time. If you want to know more, I'll send you my prac report complete with discussion, I need to finish it first though. Like now. I should be finishing it now.. due tomorrow.. yea... I'm gonna do that now :P

Hope this helped :D
Ella <3

Michaela Cdeleted
- Brisbane, Queesland, Australia

January 18, 2011

Is it not correct that the current is not actually passing through the liquid but in fact the Na ions are releasing an electron and the Cl ions are taking an electron. There is no actual handoff between the Na and Cl in the liquid. As such, once all the Na and Cl ions have become neutralized, the solution will no longer conduct current. In essence the ions are converted or used up in the process and cease to be ions. At that point, unless additional salt is added, the current flow will cease.

Doug Peebles
- Florida

January 18, 2011

Hi, Doug.

Thanks for joining into the conversation. But, unless I am misunderstanding what you are saying, I don't believe it's accurate. Similar solutions of salts are used in electroplating baths where the salt stays dissolved and conductive for decades. Sodium is far too active a metal, far too anxious to ionize, for us to be able to convert it to sodium metal simply by making an electron available at the cathode.

When NaCl is dissolved into water, it does ionize into Na+ ions and Cl- ions.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

April 20, 2011

A. Would it not be far more accurate to always state that distilled water is a very poor conductor of electricity? Rather than the absolute statement that distilled water is not a conductor of electricity. I say this because although distilled water acts more as a resistor than a conductor at certain low voltages, it can act as a conductor with a greater voltage. Therefore an absolute claim does not apply.

Jonathan Cook
- Apple Valley, California, USA

May 1, 2011

Q. My uncle works in a foundry and he said that there are 3-phase electric lines (non-insulated) running through a water tank. He said that it appears that they are using regular (not distilled) water. I assume this is meant to cool the lines. How does this not short out the system?

Michael Cooper
- Lexington Park, Maryland, USA

May 2, 2011

Hi, Michael. I'm not familiar with the application your uncle is speaking of, but the coolant in some similar applications is oil rather than water. But you could estimate the usual resistance of water and the dimensions and spacing of the wires, and calculate the approximate power consumption due to this partial shorting out.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey


May 1, 2011

Q. My son is working on his science project and we are using an ohm meter with probes placed 2 cm apart. We found that filtered water has a high resistance and water with marine salt added has a much lower resistance.

When we used filtered water near boiling the resistance was very high and chilled (38 °F) filtered water had a lower resistance.

Chilled salt water (1.25 SG) had the lowest resistance readings, 0.3 ohms.

Can anyone explain why temperature has this effect?

Tom Marcinek
- El Dorado Hills, California

May 2, 2011

A. Hi, Tom. I can't explain it because I believe your data is unfortunately incorrect. The resistivity of water and most fluids decreases with increasing temperature.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey


May 18, 2011

Q. I am doing a science project about the conductivity of water. All I want to know is how can the concentration of salt or HCl or ethanol have an effect on the conductivity of the water. I'm in grade 10

Carmen N
Student - South Africa

May 18, 2011

A. Hi, Carmen.

HCl will ionize in water to H+ and Cl-. Those charged ions are carrying charge with them as they move. Within limits, how much charge you can convey in a given time will be proportional to how many H+ and Cl- ions you have in the solution. That should pretty much answer the ethanol question too. Good luck.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

January 18, 2012

Q. Hi,

We are currently working on a project called water level indicator. We have to use distilled water as our water sample. But the problem is even with very small gap between probes, LED does no longer light up. What do we have to do to make the water conduct. We are not allowed to add any impurity like salts, etc. What are our options?

Kate Ortiz
- Davao City, Philippines


January 18, 2012

A. You can't make DI water conductive, Kate. You need to use a different type of level indicator, such as a simple float switch.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

February 7, 2012

Q. If the industries use conductivity to test for impurities in the water, will this method work for all chemical impurities? I'm in 11th grade and we are doing a lab over conductivity, and I was just not too sure about that question. Thanks.

Alex Schulte
- Robinson, Illinois, United States


February , 2012

A. Hi, Alex. No, a conductivity test would only indicate the presence of conductive ions. Lots of harmful materials do not ionize. For example, petroleum oil does not conduct electricity, and bacteria and viruses and such are life forms that do not ionize.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

February 24, 2012

Q. My 6th grade son is doing a science fair project on conductivity. When he put the positively and negatively charged wires into salt water, one of the wires started bubbling vigorously, and the water eventually turned yellow (and yes, the light bulb lit up faintly). Can anybody explain what chemical reaction may have caused these results?

Dena Araujo
- Papillion, Nebraska, USA


February 24, 2012

A. Hi Dena. The bubbles were hydrogen gas. The electricity causes water to separate into either hydrogen gas and hydroxide (OH) ions, or hydrogen gas and oxygen gas. But he needs to re-do the experiment because you guys did not note which of the two charged wires bubbled :-)

It's hard to say what turned the water yellow, but when he redoes it, pour the yellow water through a coffee filter to determine whether the yellow coloration is a dissolved material or a precipitated one. Good luck!

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey


February 21, 2013

Q. Pure distilled water is an insulator. Would it be safe standing in distilled water while working on an electric circuit? Why or why not?

Catherine Andaquig
- Philippines


February 24, 2013

A. Hi Catherine. It would not be safe. There are various degrees of distilled water purity, and the electricity could slowly or suddenly gain conductivity from things as simple as salty sweat.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

October 14, 2014

Q. Uhmm, mind if I ask you sir ... is there still an electricity on a hot water with salt ... (it's because salt dissolves faster in hot water?) Yeah and would it be a better conductor of electricity (the hot water with salt)? Thank you, I just need some information or some answers about this because I'm using this as for my Investigatory Project :)

Thanks.

John P [last name deleted for privacy by Editor]
student - Philippines

November 2014

Hi John. If you don't know the answer to a question, feel free to research it or ask people to help you. But when you don't understand a question, tell the teacher you don't understand it ... because asking for answers to questions you don't understand will only hamper your education, not help it.

Regards,

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Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
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Pine Beach, New Jersey

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