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Cleaning/restoring vintage tin humpback trunk

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Q. I am looking to remove rust that is very thin but consistent over the entire area of embossed tin on my 100 year old Humpback Trunk. Using steel wool is removing also the black paint that's on the higher part of the embossing. How can I do this without hurting the paint or the trunks wood?

Thanks Much!

John Reycraft
- Northridge, California


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Q. I have the exact same question as this person.

I really want to refinish this trunk myself, but don't want to mess it up. My trunk is covered in tin, and wooden slats which also need cleaning. The hinges are lovely/unique, but need cleaning also. I just don't want to mess this up..and then there are thick leather handles on the sides which are mostly dried out..The truck is 120 years old...

Diane Hutchins
- Fairfax, Virginia


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Q. I too have a tin covered flat top trunk that needs to be cleaned of rust. It appears to have black paint but has a lot of white spots on it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated....

Brenda Johnson
- Odessa, Texas


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A. One of my co-workers was asking me this question as well. I suggested to use Naval Jellyamazoninfo and super fine steel wool [linked by editor to product info at Rockler]. I will find out the results from my coworker and post another reply soon.

DAVID ANDERSON
- MADELIA, Minnesota


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A. In response to the rust on the tin of the black trunk. I also have the same problem and I really think it depends on the amount of rust which is on the trunk. I am in the stages of restoring an old trunk myself and have taken some ideas off the net. One idea was to use steel wool;  however, if the rust is really bad, then use a wire wheel on an electric drill. I decided to use a wire wheel and it would seem that the rust went all the way through the tin. Now I have to either patch or replace the tin. I think that I'm going to replace the tin as most of the entire top is rusted.

Kevin Brown
- Chatham, Ontario, Canada


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A. In response to the question of finishing the metal trunk, I am also refinishing a humpback metal trunk and have found that the best way so far to remove rust is to use vinegar and steel wool. I first used a wire brush to remove the thick rust, then used the vinegar and steel wool. It leaves a nice smooth surface to the metal, even cleans in the embossed grooves. I plan on painting or glazing over the metal once it's cleaned, but would like to hear any other options on refinishing. The wood slats need work and I read on the internet that when the slats are cleaned to use a golden oak Wood Stain [linked by editor to product info at Rockler] and then Tung Oilamazoninfo for protection. I have removed all the old paper from the inside of the trunk (from a 1878 catalog, I think) and would like ideas on how to finish the inside.

Beth Moffitt
- Terrace Bay, Ontario


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A. Hey Folks,

I have found a few things (some the hard way) that may help:

Only use brass wheel brushes -- they are soft and you stand a better chance of removing surface rust without eating all the way through the tin. Steel brushes will rip through rusty tin like nobody's business.

The first poster had noted they didn't want to hurt the paint - I would try the lightest possible grade of Scotchbrite pads which are designed for that kind of work and are available at hardware stores - expect a lot of rubbing though.

Try to leave the inside of the trunk unfinished (no polyurethane) - allows the wood to breathe which will mean a longer life for your trunk - less warping. There's a few different products that will turn rust into a hard metal - I have not yet tried it on tin but have tried it on steel and it works great - turns the rust black and stops the oxidation from going any further - if anyone tries it on tin please let me know how it works out (lightly brush heavily rusted area with brass brush and then apply the rust killer) should leave a black surface which retains the stamped design on the tin which can be painted. I forget the name but all hardware stores carry it.

Brass Wire Cup Brushes

Q. I currently am trying to figure out how to match paint - I would like to do an exact restoration on a tin covered trunk - anyone know what kind of paint would be appropriate for a 1880 - 1890s era trunk for the tin parts? (oil based?)

Good Luck!

Chris Hall
- Newton, New Hampshire


A. Hi, Chris. The chemical you are referring to is Rust Converteramazoninfo. Although tin is indeed a metal that is different than steel in every way, many people call steel sheet metal "tin", and my bet is that most if not all of the references to "tin", especially "rusty tin" (tin doesn't rust), are actually references to (possibly tin plated) steel sheet metal.

Lead based paint would have been used in those days, and that part you don't want to replicate. Good luck.

Regards,

pic of Ted Mooney Teds signature
Ted Mooney, P.E. RET
finishing.com
Pine Beach, New Jersey

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A. I also am refinishing several trunks. Regarding tin, the best way is to remove it from the trunk and use a good stripper on paint or a rust remover type chemical on the rust. New pieces can be had from shops that do this for a living, several are on the internet. There you will find other parts like the leather handles one person needed. Most trunks tin had a bright metal finish, very big with the Victorians of the age. Short of replating, I have tested several metal, silver, chrome paints and most come up lacking. I have found that Alclad IIamazoninfo works great. It requires a base coat of gloss black. Then the Alclad II must be sprayed on in two light coats, I use an air brush and lots of masking. The finish is hard to tell it's not plated.

I have a fancy trunk that has heavy cast metal fittings like most trunks have tin. I am trying to figure out what the soft metal is, likely lead, tin or zinc. I tend to think it is zinc. It is quite shiny when scratched or are able to remove the oxidation. I have yet to find a suitable chemical for removing this oxidation and have tried, Formby's, lacquer thinneramazoninfo, paint thinner (mineral spiritsamazoninfo), rust remover, paint stripper and most metal polishers. As it is soft I do not wish to use any form of mechanical method as it would be too ablative. If anyone has any idea what I might use the info would be very helpful.

Many trunk slate's may still have old varnish on it. To save the patina of the oak use a Formby's refinisher on it which emulsifies the old varnish removing old dirt etc. and saves the patina and you don't have to sand, stain and put plastic coatings on that in a couple of years will yellow like varnish but will need to be completely removed in order to refinish it again, and one would need to use Acetoneamazoninfo to melt it and its tough on the wood and painted surface's. Remember in restoring, less is more and some of the old ways are still the best.

I'm sure most have noted these trunks are put together completely with nails. Restoring trunks should be a screw free zone and if you have one with pressed tin in good condition it would be a shame to cover it with some goofy colored paint. God the paint I have stripped off of truly wonderful orig. finish's that now I could not save.

Hope that gives all some tips and if anyone can help me with my problem it would be greatly appreciated.

Trunk On!

Greg Matson
- Milpitas, California


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A. I have refinished many trunks and the best chemical to apply on the rust is a product called Extendamazoninfo rust converter. It chemically bonds to the rust and prevents further rust formation. It causes the surface you are coating to become (somewhat) black. You can paint right over this product. Pour off only what you need because you can react the whole container of Extend by just placing the excess back into the container.

JoAnn Domanski
- Kennett Square, Pennsylvania


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A. In refinishing mine, I used a wire wheel with electric drill. It was pretty badly rusted. I put a piece of aluminum flashing bent in an L shape to put up against the wood when I needed to clean next to it. There are several different grades of wire wheels, I am not sure which one I used, but is was a finer variety (no heavy scratches on the metal). Use it with an electric drill not battery powered one (not enough speed).

I went back, taped and put rustoleum black on the metal. Then I waited a few minutes and took a cloth with thinner on it to remove the highlighted embossing (alligator print). I was very happy with the results. The trunk went from something we couldn't even sell at a garage sale to one of our most prized antiques. I lined it with cedar and it now holds blankets in our family room.

Rob Wagner
- Kansas City, Missouri


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A. I have a humpback trunk and the best results for me is to use a high speed Dremelamazoninfo type tool with a wire brush. First of all clean the surface with 3M type brillo pads, then apply paint remover onto surface and allow to work into old painted surface, then use a small stainless steel hand brush (toothbrush shape )and brush in circular and crisscross pattern and wipe brushed surface with an old towel cloth. Take your electric rotary tool, insert wire bristle cone shape brush into rotary tool and brush surface to remove stubborn paint surfaces. When you go out and purchase your cone brushes and hand brush, the wire bristle has to be a fine grade and not your typical coarse wire brush. You will also need to purchase at least 3-4 rotary brushes. Please be sure to wear safety glasses,gloves and respirator when doing this job. Also you may have to use more than one application process to do the job right. GOOD LUCK

Ron Petter
- Austin, Texas


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A. Lime-A-Wayamazoninfo. I know, I laughed when I heard it too. But it works! On a thin layer of rust, limeaway loosens the rust and you can just wipe it off with a rag. If the surface is pitted, try a tooth brush with limeaway on it.

John Patrick
- Cheney, Washington


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Q. Where can I find a cone shaped wire brush to fit on my drill to clean wheels where the big one won't fit ?

Cara Grimes
consumer - Prattville, Alabama


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Q. I was wondering if any of you have any suggestions on how to preserve the inside of the trunk. I recently just purchased on and the inside is in really good condition. It has a little bit of a smell to it, but the original picture is still there with only a few little cracks from drying out. I think it would be a shame to get rid of this. Any suggestions?

Shanna Firnekas
- Wright, Wyoming

Wire Brush Wheels


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A. Responding to the smell in old trunks. I put a good bit of Febrezeamazoninfo on a rag (don't spray directly in trunk) and left inside for a while. It helped a lot.

Diane Lueck
- Friendship, Wisconsin


July 6, 2008

Q. I have a metal trunk that is in relatively good condition-i will only clean the outside of my trunk and maintain the rustic look. The original tray that is in the trunk is fiberboard and needs to be refinished somehow. It has a paper covering that is wearing out. Would welcome suggestions.

Bonnie Palmer
home owner - Le Mars, Iowa


August 23, 2008

A. I was told to remove the old paper inside, most have glued on paper, with vinegar and water in a spray bottle spray and then let sit until it softens and then pull it off, sand wood, sprinkle baby powder and put wadded up newspapers in it and close the lid, after a few days clean powder out, spray with a varnish inside....if you want to repaper then you can..with wallpaper or whatever you have..

Mary Beth Burge
- Kennewick, Washington


February 27, 2009

Q. I am terribly confused! I was given an old humpback trunk by a relative a few months ago, and it was clearly in some need of TLC. I believe that it is tin, and the middle section appears to have been spray painted with gray (not even silver-just a dull gray) while the outer sections have been painted black (I am pretty sure that neither of the paints were original, because they both can be found on the wood slat things). The initial internet search I did brought me to the conclusion that both paints should be removed... and I have already started doing so with a fine grade of steel wool...
Have I completely ruined my antique trunk, or am I on the right track?! I am trying to restore it -- I don't want to make it look modern or paint it some random, crazy, or unreasonable color to match the walls or drapes in a room in my house, or something!

PLEASE HELP! (THANK YOU!)

Nicole Roth
- Bloomington, Illinois


April 13, 2009

A. For very comprehensive advice on the restoration of old trunks go to: www.brettunsvillage.com/trunks/howto/howto.html

Gene McCarthy
- Palos Verdes Estates, California


January 23, 2010

Q. From all of my research indicates you're right about using Alclad IIamazoninfo for refinishing heavily rusted "tin" on old trunks. Can you tell me what I can expect for coverage per 1 oz of Alclad paint? I'm trying to determine how much base and how much paint I'm going to need.

Thanks -

Nick

Nick Kader
- Hampstead, North Carolina


August 10, 2013 -- this entry appended to this thread by editor in lieu of spawning a duplicative thread

Q. I have on old rectangular wooden trunk with metal strapping. How do I renew the metal without destroying the value of the trunk?

Don M.
- Oregon
  ^- Privately contact this inquirer -^

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